Wednesday, 10 June 2015

Not Before Time

I've finally managed to get the tomatoes in to their final positions. The bush varieties were planted up a couple of weeks ago but I've held off sorting out the cordons until the wind died down, I don't think a bashing from the gusts we've had just lately would have done them much good.

I'll start with the cordons, I'm growing four plants outdoors, two each of Ailsa Craig and Gardener's Delight. I've decided to use growbags again for these, each one cut in half and stood on its end. The plants seem to do well grown in this way.


There's three cordon varieties in the greenhouse, Ailsa Craig, Gardener's Delight and a heritage variety I picked up as a young plant from a local garden centre a while ago, Bloody Butcher. It's the one on the left of the photo, it looks a little droopy, I'm not sure if it's a characteristic of the plant, it's a potato leaf variety, or if it's sulking since being planted up. I'm looking forward to trying this one. I'm growing these plants in self watering containers.


Outdoors I have four bush tomatoes, three Maskotka and a Totem. The Totem's on the left of the photo. I've also got two Maskotkas in the greenhouse.


So that's it for tomatoes this year, I feel a little unadventurous with my choices, apart from the Bloody Butcher, so I might try some new ones next year, I think it's time for a bit of a play around again, though I shall always include some Maskotkas now, my new favourite.

30 comments:

  1. I see that you have acquired a few of the self-watering containers like the ones I use. I think they are perfect for the job. Standing some pots in seed-trays like you have done is also a good idea. It must make watering a lot easier and less wasteful. I am, also (as you know) a big fan of Maskotka. I have got lots of different varieties this year, because I am growing for the fun of it, not for quantity production (though of course I'm hoping for a good crop!)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I got the containers at the back end of 2013 so I used them for the first time last year. If you remember, my tomato plants weren't at their best last year so it would have been unfair to compare the planters to those I usually use, but they're a great size and it does help that you don't have to keep an eye on watering quite as much as you would with ordinary containers. I try to water the other plants from the seed trays rather than through the compost, my dad's always told me water from the bottom, feed from the top, I'm not sure how true this is but it seems to work. Gardening is all about having fun so I don't blame you trying lots of different varieties, I've done that too over the years and I think I shall have a bit more fun myself next year.

      Delete
  2. Cricky that's a lot of tomatoes, plants look healthy, we have three plants outside not growing any in greenhouse this year

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I suppose it is, especially considering that there's only me in the house who eats them, though my mum and dad manage to get through quite a few and I like to use them for cooking as well as for eating raw. I had a few problems with my plants last year so I'm relieved that they're looking much better this year, just hoping for a good harvest now.

      Delete
  3. My rather small tomato plants are still on the window sill at home but I'm hoping to move them to the plot in the next few days. I think that yours will do better than mine this year. Flighty xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have to admit that I'm pleased with my tomato plants so far this year after the problems they suffered last year. The Bloody Butcher plant's already got a tomato on it, though I've read that it's supposed to be a quick maturing variety so that's something I'll be looking out for.

      Delete
  4. We have all our tomato plants in the greenhouse. I hope yours all do well.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My greenhouse is only 4X6 so I wouldn't fit them all in there. Saying that, I never really see a difference in the plants grown in there from the ones grown outdoors.

      Delete
  5. Everything is looking very orderly. I've not heard of Bloody Butcher and sounds interesting. Hubby has grown the usual varieties from saved seed except a plum that was given to him my a sister-in-law when we went down to Berkshire. We have Roma, San Marzano (two types of plum), Cuore di Bue (beef) and Tigerella (medium round). Any success this year will depend on the amount of produce as only the Roma and the Tigerella have produced a quantity of fruit so far.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I must admit that I sometimes grow plants because of their names, isn't Bloody Butcher brilliant? I nearly left it in the garden centre but went back for it at the last minute. I think I've grown all the varieties you're growing this year at one time or another, I'm giving the plums and beefs a miss this year though. I do like Tigerella, that's been a favourite over the years.

      Delete
  6. That Bloody Butcher sounds like an interesting heirloom variety. Look forward to finding out what you think about it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have to admit that it was the name which swayed me. I've heard of it before but reading up about it, it sounds like it may do well in our climate.

      Delete
  7. I grew Bloody Butcher last year (and it's in the lineup again this year) and loved it! It was delicious, but it's true value was in it's earliness. It was by far the earliest tomato I grew - it started producing 12 days sooner than any other variety (including some that were touted as being "early") and had given me a total of 14 tomatoes before any others were ready for harvest. I'm always so anxious for that first tomato that this is a huge plus for me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's good to know someone who has grown Bloody Butcher. I've heard of it before but have never grown it but I didn't know much about it until I looked it up once I'd bought it. It is billed as being an early variety and it's actually got a tomato on the plant already so things look good so far. I'm hoping that it's got a good taste too.

      Delete
  8. They're looking good Jo. I sowed late this year so the plants are still relatively small and a while off flowering yet. I'm glad to read that you are planting some of your Maskotka outside as that is what I'm planning to do with mine.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My plants are much better than they were last year so I'm hoping for good things from them. I grew Maskotka outdoors last year and they did really well, I do like to try both indoors and outdoors but I never see a huge difference between them.

      Delete
  9. Good job well done Jo !

    Be very interested to see how the heritage variety plant does.

    Happy Growing

    All the best Jan

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm looking forward to trying Bloody Butcher, it's supposed to suit our climate and have a good flavour too so it will be interesting giving it a go.

      Delete
  10. Whoever comes up with such bizarre names for tomatoes.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bloody Butcher is one I've heard of before, it stuck in my memory because of its name. They do make me want to try them when they've got a funny or unusual name.

      Delete
  11. I hope that you have lots of yummy tomatoes later in the summer! You certainly deserve to having done all of this hard work. xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hope so too. I just need the wind to stay away now so that it doesn't bash the plants about.

      Delete
  12. It all looks so lovely and neat.......now all you have to do is wait for the crops, with a little bit of tlc, of course.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm glad I've finally managed to get them all set out, I'm late this year owing to the winds we've had. I think it'll be a while before they start providing fruit.

      Delete
  13. I'm so disappointed that I lost some of my Maskotkas, I only have one now, and it's not looking very good either. I've got Orkado, which is a new variety to me, and I found a Red Pear at the allotment "Free Stuff" place the other day, so that came home with me as well. I've heard that tomatoes do well in grow bags too. Let's hope the weather is kind to them. If I see any Maskotka plants I shall pick a couple up, I really want to try them. CJ xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The Maskotkas I grew last year were plants I'd bought from a local plant sale so you may be lucky and find some for sale somewhere. I was so impressed by them, they're definitely on my must grow list now. I wish we had a Free Stuff place at our allotment, it's a good way to pass things on if you've grown too many and also a good place to pick things up too.

      Delete
  14. What a coincidence :-) I'm also growing Ailsa Craig and Gardener's Delight this year, plus a heritage variety I found at a local plant sale - Harbinger. Good luck with your plants, looks like you have them set up very nicely.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ailsa Craig is one of my dad's old favourites and I think I've grown Gardener's Delight every year since I started growing tomatoes. I have to say though that Maskotka took over from Gardener's Delight as my favourite cherry tomato last year, I'm growing them both again this year just to make sure but I may not bother with Gardener's Delight next year if Maskotka are as good again for me this year. The advantage is that they're a good cropping bush tomato so they don't even need much care, not much tying in or pinching out.

      Delete
  15. Like minds! I have finally sorted all my tomatoes too! Yours do look good, be interesting to see how they all get on!xxx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm glad I got them done when I did as we're back to rain again this weekend. Just so long as the wind doesn't make a return appearance.

      Delete

 
!-- Start of StatCounter Code for Blogger / Blogspot -->